Weekly Wire

Volume III, Issue 32
January 31 - February 7, 2000  
Music

Featured Articles
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Hit Charades [2]
Looking back on '99 through the lens of recent pop compilations, future historians will have little choice but to conclude that it was a ghastly year for songwriting.
— Douglas Wolk, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Artist Profiles
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Neil Before Me [3]
Neil Diamond concerts are treated by music writers as a welcome chance to tee off, but he still remains the top-grossing solo performer of the '90s.
— Andrew Weiner, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Texas Troubadour [4]
Jack Ingram's tough Texan tales appeal to listeners--but not to country radio programmers.
— Michael McCall, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Hall-of-Fame Hitter [5]
Drummer Earl Palmer, an inductee as well as an outspoken critic of the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame, remembers the turbulent '50s and '60s in Los Angeles.
— Ted Drozdowski, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Mr. Holland's Opus [6]
Joe Holland makes slick pop music, but he does it on his own terms.
— Noel Murray, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
They May Be Crazy [7]
Just in time for the release of their new CD, the Subteens find a drummer that sticks.
— Mark Jordan, MEMPHIS FLYER
 

Album Reviews
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Tropical Punch [8]
Today calypso is a carefree island sound, but in the '40s and '50s it was progressive political music that gave a voice Africa's anti-imperialists.
— Norman Weinstein, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Uneasy Listening [9]
Sound-art duo Ultra-Red's latest project is a terrifying document of LA urban renewal and the redevelopment of Latino neighborhoods.
— Josh Kun, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

L ooking back on 1999 through the lens of musical compilations, future historians will have little choice but to conclude that it was a ghastly year for progress in pop songwriting.

In the 30-plus years since he first hit the popular music charts, Neil Diamond has sold more than 110 million records, and he holds records for sellouts at arenas on both sides of the country, yet he can't get a break from the critics.

A two-CD set of a classic 1946 concert of Calypso music showcases the style in its various forms, including political songs, bawdy dance tunes, a drum jam, and a traditional mock martial-arts "stick fight" drama.

Also, the tweaked and twisted layers of sound from Ultra-Red, the Subteens finally score a drummer, and more.


Mini Reviews
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Boston Phoenix CD Reviews [10]

  • Blue Man Group
  • Michael Moore
  • What We Live
  • Tara Jane O'Neil
  • Big Bud
  • Bernard Butler
  • Starflyer 59
  • Ray Barretto and New World Spirit + 4
Tiny Tunes [11]
  • Prozzak
  • Pete Ham
  • Jim Allen
Turn Up That Noise! [12]
Now What? [13]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE

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