Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 40
March 28 - April 3, 2000  

Features
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Page Turner [2]
After years of pursuing a career as a writer, Nashvillian Sallie Bissell has finally achieved the sort of success that few writers can claim.
— Michael Sims, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
As Much Magic as Fact [3]
In the month since the publication of Stephen Harrigan's historical novel The Gates of the Alamo, a visible restructuring of the public notion of the fort has seized the imagination of Texas.
— David Garza, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

'The Gates of the Alamo' Reviewed [4]
Mark Busby reviews Stephen Harrigan's "The Gates of the Alamo."
— Mark Busby, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Non-fiction
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Darwin and the Deity [5]
Kenneth Miller's "Finding Darwin's God" and John Haught's "God After Darwin" both suggest new ways of understanding God without subscribing to fundamentalist religion and materialist science.
— Jeffrey Gantz, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Future Imperfect [6]
Tuning in tomorrow with "Predictions: Thirty Great Minds On the Future."
— Ben Winters, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 
Homemade Beauty [7]
A survey of new books on folk art.
— Diann Blakely, NASHVILLE SCENE
 

Poetry
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Historical Amnesia [8]
One poet's personal attempt to come to terms with the forgotten crimes committed against Indian people.
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 


S





LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

allie Bissell's first suspense novel is written and paid for, but it isn't even published yet. Nonetheless, even the most cynical observer has to admit that she has already leapt ahead of the pack, and the attention would appear to be well-deserved.

For those who still cling to the notions of the Alamo myth, much of Stephen Harrigan's sober extraction of fact from the records of history may be hard to accept. Ultimately, though, Harrigan's work is not an academic endeavor, but an affecting work of fiction.

In their new books on evolution and religion, Kenneth R. Miller and John F. Haught both suggest new ways of understanding God that leave materialist science and fundamentalist Christianity back in the cosmic dust.

Also, looking into the future, new tomes on folk art, and more.


Mini Reviews
Want to know what all these checkboxes are for? Click here to find out, or just ignore them.

Speed Reader [9]

  • "The Federal Landscape: An Economic History of the Twentieth-Century West" by Gerald D. Nash
  • "The Autobiography of a Tibetan Monk" by Palden Gyats

Now What? [10]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


Build your own custom paper. To find out more about this feature, click here.


Search & Archives
Search the archives using the form below or browse through them by issue, author, or column.

Enter one or more keywords to search for:







Page Back Last Issue Current Issue Next Issue Page Forward

Books: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Cover . News . Film . Music . Arts . Books . Comics . Search

Weekly Wire    © 1995-99 DesertNet, LLC . Info Booth . Powered by Dispatch