Weekly Wire

Volume III, Issue 42
April 10 - April 17, 2000  
 
Music

Artist Profiles
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King Of The World Beat [3]
Nigeria's King Sunny Ade is perhaps the greatest Afro-pop star of all time.
— Ron Bally, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
American Beauty [4]
Practically pop stars in the UK with their arty, skewered sound, the Butterflies of Love are sill trying to land gig in the Northeast.
— Richard Martin, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Hey Punks! [5]
Jade Tree's Explosion are one of the best punk bands to emerge from an ever-evolving genre.
— Carly Carioli, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Album Reviews
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Growing Pains [6]
Unlike many pillars of hip hop's golden yesteryear, MC Common (aka Common Sense) remains true and fresh on his new "Like Water for Chocolate."
— Michael Endelman, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Saint Lou's return [7]
Lou Reed's acerbic and insightful "Ecstasy" rocks harder than his best post-Velvet Underground work.
— Ted Drozdowski, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Shoah Biz [8]
It's clear that the motive behind Rhino's release of "Voices of the Shoah," a four-disc audio documentary featuring Holocaust survivors, is to make money.
— Josh Kun, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Volts from the Underground [9]
The newly released "Ohm: The Early Gurus of Electronic Music 1948-1980" may seem boring until you consider that all of the sounds on the disc are originals.
— Douglas Wolk, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Wild Reeds [10]
Two veteran saxophonists reemerge with new releases and reissues.
— Ron Wynn, NASHVILLE SCENE
 

Now What? [12]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

N ashville's new crop of young singers aren't without talent -- they have impressive voices and are comfortable, engaging performers -- but they're focusing on brightly melodic, lightly rhythmic tunes that value energy and effervescence over substance and emotion.

Lou Reed's new album is his best work in more than a decade, rocking harder, with lyrics that probe what it means to be human, tempered with a poignance acquired from decades of self-examination.

Most Americans won't understand a word sung by King Sunny Ade, and they don't need to. The music transcends language; it's about dancing, singing and feeling good.

Plus, voices from the Holocaust, a history of electronic music, and more.


Featured Articles
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The Young and the Restless [2]
Country music is banking on young artists, but that doesn't mean it can't bank on talent, too.
— Michael McCall, NASHVILLE SCENE
 

Mini Reviews
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Boston Phoenix CD Reviews [11]

  • Pedro the Lion
  • Bloodhound Gang
  • The Gunga Din
  • Giant Sand
  • Danny Tenaglia
  • Dimitri from Paris
  • Mamadou Diabate
  • Caetano Veloso

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