Weekly Wire

Volume III, Issue 44
April 24 - May 1, 2000  
Music

Featured Articles
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Lost Country [2]
The genius of a Trisha Yearwood's "Real Live Woman" is that she cashes in on songs that have as much depth as a greeting card, and acts as if they were profound.
— Grant Alden, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
The White Stuff [3]
James Toback's "Black and White" was supposed to explore white America's infatuation with hip-hop culture, but racial stereotypes get in the way.
— Josh Kun, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Oh, The Guilt [4]
The top five recent releases that made "High Fidelity" hit a little too close to home.
— Douglas Wolk, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 

Artist Profiles
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Delta Force [5]
In a rare series of tours to promote their new albums, Big Jack Johnson and Super Chikan bring the gritty blues of Clarksdale, Mississippi, to the rest of the country.
— Ted Drozdowski, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Kickin' Brass [6]
Horn player Karl Denson in on a mission to put his music on the airwaves.
— Edwin Decker, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Album Reviews
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Homesick Again [7]
Reissues recognize the work of unheralded bluesman.
— Ron Wynn, NASHVILLE SCENE
 

Live Report
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Hungry Heart [8]
Bruce Springsteen's Nashville concert gave the audience a near-religious experience.
— Bill Friskics-Warren, NASHVILLE SCENE
 


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

B ruce Springsteen's recent concert in Nashville was a stirring revival, as fiery and relevant a set as any of us is likely to hear from a pre-punk rock act at this late date.

Country music used to be about hurting and cheating and drinking it away on a bad morning and maybe figuring out what to do after. The contemporary country artist sings songs written with the depth of a greeting card and acts as if such shallowness were profound.

James Toback's new movie, "Black and White," is business as usual: the story of white people fetishizing black people as illicit objects of taboo desire, a story told and publicized by white people.

Plus, Clarksdale blues on the road, hitting close to home with "High Fidelity," and more.


Mini Reviews
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Boston Phoenix CD Reviews [9]

  • Melvins
  • Pantera
  • Built To Spill
  • Travis
  • Diggin in the Crates
  • Beanie Sigel
  • Joshua Redman
  • Matthew Goodheart

Rhythm and Views [10]
  • Zeke
  • Robbie Fulks

Now What? [11]
If you go gaga over the sultry smoothness of a symphonic glissando, just wait till you experience our transitions to cool and useful music links on the Web.
WEEKLY WIRE
 

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