Weekly Wire
Books
Volume III, Issue 2
July 5 - July 12, 1999  
 
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Fiction
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Bank On It [6]
Hunt down a copy of Melissa Bank's "The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing."
— Shelly Ridenour, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 
Option Overload [7]
Tedium and confusion finally outweigh "One Hundred and One Ways' " other merits.
— Randall Holdridge, TUCSON WEEKLY
 

Non-fiction
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Physical Examination [8]
In "The Male Body," Susan Bordo takes a long, hard (ahem) look at her subject.
— Megan Harlan, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Body Works [9]
Natalie Angier's "Woman: An Intimate Geography" debunks sexist myths with a world-class nonsense detector.
— Susan Miron, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
Book Reviews [10]
"The Onassis Women: An Eyewitness Account" by Kiki Feroudi Moutsatsos. "Maria Callas: Sacred Monster" by Stelios Galatopoulos.
— Stephen Macmillan Moser, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Writing by Nature [11]
Milkweed Editions' inaugural series on art, activism, and the writer's credo.
— Charles Scheer, MEMPHIS FLYER
 

Mini Reviews
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Off the Bookshelf [12]

  • "Ultimate Sports Lists" by Mike Meserole
  • "Barney's Version" by Mordecai Richler
  • "Run Catch Kiss" by Amy Sohn
  • "Plays Well With Others" by Allan Gurganus

  Speed Reader [13]
  • "Couples and Loneliness" by Nan Goldin
  • "England, England" by Julian Barnes

 

A





LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

nyone who's actually read Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima" will recognize that the charges made by a California school district -- which removed the book from its ninth-grade curriculum -- are ludicrous.

The MacArthur Foundation has awarded one of its "genius grants" to Ofelia Zepeda for her unusual cluster of activities on behalf of native languages.

Melissa Bank's new collection of short stories feels like nothing so much as a sequel to Judy Blume's quality adolescent fiction.

Also, separate works examine men's bodies and women's bodies, the first volumes in a new series from authors explaining the aesthetics that underpin their work, and more.


Features
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Read It, Kids! Your Parents Don't Have to Know! [2]
An acknowledged classic of Chicano literature and a celebrated piece of New Mexico's literary heritage runs afoul of some parents.
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Tohono Titan [3]
The MacArthur Foundation praises Ofelia Zepeda for her unusual cluster of activities on behalf of native languages.
— Margaret Regan, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Author Literatus [4]
Steven Saylor sets his novels in ancient Rome, but has quite a few modern ideas about the state of the author in the contemporary publishing climate.
— Clay Smith, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Ms. Write [5]
Since Carolyn Banks crosses genres both across and within works, why does she offer advice to new authors to "find a channel and stick with it"?
— Jessica Berthold, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 
Now What? [14]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


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