Weekly Wire
Books
Volume IV, Issue 8
August 14 - August 21, 2000  

Features
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Dirty Words [2]
Roger Gathman delves into bookstores' shelves of smut to investigate the collective Gestalt of erotica.
— Roger Gathman, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Fiction
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Marriage À La Mode [3]
Diane Johnson walks down the aisle with another comedy of Franco-American manners.
— J. Uschuk, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Bleak Houses [4]
In her 1989 novel "Fludd", Hilary Mantel builds an unlikely sympathy with the often self-limiting characters.
— Clea Simon, THE BOSTON PHOENIX
 
"Sign" Language [5]
Aimee Bender is in possession of a writing voice that is so fresh as to be like no other.
— Shelly Ridenour, NEWCITY CHICAGO
 
Shades of Brown [6]
Larry Brown gives his heroine a strong voice in "Fay."
— Diann Blakely, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Now What? [7]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


I




LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

t has been a long time since the written word, no matter how laden with sexual description, has been up in the dock. The contemporary controversy about the legal control of pornography is almost wholly about visuals. That turn in the way we think about sexual representation -- the takeover by the audio-visual sector of a genre that, for hundreds of years, was all text and gravure -- has overshadowed the continuing life of the genre. Dirty books are not obsolete.

More of a companion piece than sequel to her National Book Award finalist "Le Divorce," Diane Johnson's ninth novel traverses the cultural difference between Americans and the French with hilarity and grace.

In her 1989 novel, "Fludd," Hilary Mantel uses bleakness as a backdrop. Against such emptiness her sense of the absurd comes into high relief, and the ordinary failings -- and frivolities -- of humanity appear in whimsical contrast.

Also, Aimee Bender's fresh writing voice, Larry Brown's storytelling depth, and more.



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