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Books
Volume III, Issue 10
August 30 - September 7, 1999  
 
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Fiction
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Sex Kick [3]
John Gilmore's "Fetish Blonde" asks readers to question how far they themselves are willing to go.
— Devin D. O'Leary, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
A Way With Words [4]
A recently reissued collection of short stories by Caroline Gordon, exquisite Southern Writer.
— Charles Wyrick, NASHVILLE SCENE
 
Da Wuhndahs of da Invisible Woyld [5]
David Gates' "The Wonders of the Invisible World."
— Steven Robert Allen, WEEKLY ALIBI
 
Dorothy Cave's 'Mountains of the Blue Stone' [6]
A fine read for anyone trying to grasp New Mexico's elusive, yet enchanting, mystique.
— Franchesca Stevens, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Non-fiction
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Man-Made Controversy [7]
A philosopher provides an informative look at the history of the anti-evolution movement.
— Tom Danehy, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Drowning In Junk [8]
"Consuming Desires" assembles a stellar cast of contributors to argue against consumerism in a collection of essays.
— Gregory McNamee, TUCSON WEEKLY
 
Life Studies [9]
Women, race, class, and engendering the South.
— Leonard Gill, MEMPHIS FLYER
 
Betty Fusell's 'The Story of Corn' [10]
Pages of corn fact fun, corn industry history, and the spiritual uses of corn in indigenous cultures.
— Mary Walling Blackburn, WEEKLY ALIBI
 

Now What? [12]
Love to read? Need some clever ideas? Our library of resources and staff picks are guaranteed to turn on plenty of mental light bulbs via your electrified eye sockets.
WEEKLY WIRE
 


T







LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

he 1999 Diana literary collection is primarily paperback versions of the hardbacks that marked the first anniversary of her death last year, but there are a couple of worthy entries in the Dianarama amongst them.

With his latest book, John Gilmore has dropped the formality of nonfiction to plumb a depth of darkness in the human soul that his previous real-life confessionals couldn't offer up.

Philosopher Robert J. Pennock offers an authoritative and lively refutation of creationism, with an informative look at the history of the anti-evolution movement.

Plus works by Caroline Gordon, David Gates, Dorothy Cave, and more.



Features
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The Huntress Captured by the Game [2]
The second anniversary of Princess Diana's death has brought some clunky and some surprising -- and surprisingly good -- new books to the fore.
— Margaret Moser, AUSTIN CHRONICLE
 

Mini Reviews
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Off the Bookshelf [11]

  • "End of an Age" by Paul Graham
  • "A Certain Age" by Tama Janowitz
  • "Zen Computer" by Philip Toshio Sudo
  • "Sciborg Sam and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence" by Alexander Uriostegui


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